let your spine be loose like seaweed




Blissologist, yogi, surfer, lululemon ambassador...Eoin Finn is closely connected to and inspired by the ocean. Our yoga storyteller Alana recently sat down with Eoin to find out how his passion for yoga and the ocean relate to one another.

alana: what does it mean to make our spine loose like seaweed? Should i do this in every yoga pose?

eoin: When I cue students to fold forward from the hips, I tell them to let their heads get heavy on their spines and free the arms to dangle side to side like seaweed undulating in an ocean current.  When we relax our body and mind we can feel the rhythms of our energy body and we release all stiffness, tension and stress.  This opens us up to a deep experience of presence and bliss.

It wouldn’t be practical to do this in every pose. Different tools are needed in yoga depending on whether we are sinking into the gravitational field or trying to lift up and away from it.  Sinking into gravity feeling our energetic self is more yin and resisting gravity engaging muscles would be more yang. It is important to have this yin softness while resisting gravity and the stability of yang while being passive.  Finding this balance in all poses is the ongoing dance of a great yoga practice.


Photo credit: Ali Kaukas
alana: what does it mean to make our spine loose like seaweed? Should i do this in every yoga pose?

eoin: When I cue students to fold forward from the hips, I tell them to let their heads get heavy on their spines and free the arms to dangle side to side like seaweed undulating in an ocean current.  When we relax our body and mind we can feel the rhythms of our energy body and we release all stiffness, tension and stress.  This opens us up to a deep experience of presence and bliss.

It wouldn’t be practical to do this in every pose. Different tools are needed in yoga depending on whether we are sinking into the gravitational field or trying to lift up and away from it.  Sinking into gravity feeling our energetic self is more yin and resisting gravity engaging muscles would be more yang. It is important to have this yin softness while resisting gravity and the stability of yang while being passive.  Finding this balance in all poses is the ongoing dance of a great yoga practice.


Photo credit: Ali Kaukas
alana: what does yoga have to do with the ocean?

eoin: The Ocean is my biggest fuel.  To me, it is a shrine of beauty and interconnection. When I stand in front of the ocean I realize that I am no longer contained by four walls, nor am I walled in by my problems or stress. Instead, there is part of me that is as vast and beautiful as an oceanic horizon.  Touching this place in all of us, is the source of health and our deepest joy.  One of my life’s major goals is to allow more people to feel the same magic I do when I am by the ocean.

alana: who is YOUR teacher(s) and how did you find them?

eoin: I found my teachers by following my interests; first in yoga philosophy, then in meditation, then the physical practice, and later an interest in the mind-body connection.  My curiosity and passion guided me to find people who were qualified to help me evolve my understanding.

Ravi Ravindra, Nadia Toraman, Pattabhi Jois, David Swenson,  Gioia Irwin, Orit Sen Gupta and a host of many other have all been my yoga teachers over the years.  I really learned the benefit of a spine moving like seaweed from Body Mind Psychotherapy Teacher Susan Aposhyan.

Where do you find energy, connection and renewal?

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1 Comment »


Hi there,

I just wanted to add a comment indicating that the downward dog done in-between stretches does wonders to stretch the spine. This is especially true for people who are looking to include kundalini yoga into their routine.

Alana

Comment by Alana — April 17, 2013 @ 4:02 am


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